Warren Buffett Quotes

Investing can turn out to be a touch game for most of us.

How about getting a piece of advice from an expert par excellence?

And when that advice comes from none another than Warren Buffett himself, you just can’t afford to miss.

In the ongoing presentation, we have compiled some very interesting and highly useful Warren Buffett Quotes. These precious Warren Buffettpearls of wisdom are spoken by Warren Buffett himself, who has been recognized as one of the greatest master of investment of all times. You stand to benefit by following his advice for investment which are the outcome of his experience and great knowledge that he has gained over the years.

Popularly known as “Oracle of Omaha”, Warren Buffett is a living legend. Born on 30th August 1930, Warren Buffet is an American investor, business magnet and a philanthropist. He is the second richest American and third richest person in the world with a net worth of $44 Billion. He is the CEO of Berkshire Hathaway, a holding company with many subsidiaries.

Inspite of being super wealthy, Warren Buffett prefers to live a simple life. He is well known for his humble, courteous, and personable behavior. Warren Buffett is a genius in investing and his “golden” words on investing can surely help to enlighten and make you aware of the realities of investment.

So you can go through the Warren Buffett Quotes that we have compiled for you and you would surely discover great investing advice from the Great Man, Warren Buffett himself.

Investors should remember that excitement and expenses are their enemies. And if they insist on trying to genius in investing, they should try to be fearful when others are greedy and greedy only when others are fearful.

It’s far better to buy a wonderful company at a fair price than a fair company at a wonderful price.

Long ago, Ben Graham taught me that ‘Price is what you pay; value is what you get.’ Whether we’re talking about socks or stocks, I like buying quality merchandise when it is marked down.

You don’t need to be a rocket scientist. Investing is not a game where the guy with the 160 IQ beats the guy with 130 IQ.

When we own portions of outstanding businesses with outstanding managements, our favorite holding period is forever.

The best thing that happens to us is when a great company gets into temporary trouble…We want to buy them when they’re on the operating table.

Over the long term, the stock market news will be good. In the 20th century, the United States endured two world wars and other traumatic and expensive military conflicts; the Depression; a dozen or so recessions and financial panics; oil shocks; a flu epidemic; and the resignation of a disgraced president. Yet the Dow rose from 66 to 11,497.

Wide diversification is only required when investors do not understand what they are doing.

Why not invest your assets in the companies you really like? As Mae West said, “Too much of a good thing can be wonderful.

The first rule is not to lose. The second rule is not to forget the first rule.

If a business does well, the stock eventually follows.

It’s far better to buy a wonderful company at a fair price than a fair company at a wonderful price.

Look at market fluctuations as your friend rather than your enemy; profit from folly rather than participate in it.

Only buy something that you’d be perfectly happy to hold if the market shut down for 10 years.

Wall Street is the only place that people ride to in a Rolls Royce to get advice from those who take the subway.

I don’t look to jump over 7-foot bars: I look around for 1-foot bars that I can step over.

We simply attempt to be fearful when others are greedy and to be greedy only when others are fearful.

It’s better to hang out with people better than you. Pick out associates whose behavior is better than yours and you’ll drift in that direction.

If you’re an investor, you’re looking on what the asset is going to do, if you’re a speculator, you’re commonly focusing on what the price of the object is going to do, and that’s” not our game.

The stock market is a no-called-strike game. You don’t have to swing at everything—you can wait for your pitch. The problem when you’re a money manager is that your fans keep yelling, “Swing, you bum!

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